Lifestyle

7 fascinating underwater cities you need to explore!

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Did you know that there are places across the world where you can find real underwater cities?


While most of them were submerged due to flood, others were the result of waterways and reservious constructions.

So, if you are intrigued and want to include them in your wishlist, here are seven real cities that are actually completely underwater.

1. Port Royal, Jamaica

A massive earthquake, followed by a tsunami on June 7, submerged the city of Port Royal and killed 2000 people. It was once called the earth’s wickedest city, as it was home to real-life pirates of the Caribbean and also the reason why the city’s sinking was deemed as an act of God. Now, the city is deemed as one of the world’s best-preserved underwater cities, with just a few items being removed and placed in museums across Jamaica. When here, one can scuba dive to the sunken city, after taking required permission from the authorities.

2. Dwarka, India

Also known as the Gateway to Heaven, the city of Dwarka was, reportedly, discovered in 1988, submerged around 100 ft below the Gulf of Cambay. Underneath, ancient structures, grids, pillars, and ancient artifacts were found. While some are of the view that the city might be at least 10000 years old, others opine that the city would be 5000 years old. There are others who claim that the Gujarat Sultan Mahmud Begada attacked the city in 1473 and destroyed the temple of Dwarka.

3. Baia, Italy

This submerged underwater city is believed to be the city where not pirates, but hedonistic Romans used to flock to Baia; it was dubbed as the Las Vegas of ancient Rome. Alas, as it happened to other cities, Baia sank likely because of the region’s active volcanic activities. Reports suggest that most part of the city lies at a depth of less than 20 ft, and around 2000-year-old remains are found here underwater in almost perfect condition.

4. Pavlopetri, Greece

Archeologists estimate that Pavlopetri is around 5000 years old. Believed to be the oldest underwater city, Pavopetri was discovered in 1967, which seemed like ancient ruins. Later, a survey that was carried a year later revealed a plan of a prehistoric town which is thought to be Mycenaean, lying under 3 to 12 ft of water in Peloponnese. Referring to this, Jon Henderson of the University of Nottingham stated, “It is a unique discovery in the sense that we have found on the seabed an almost complete city, with streets, buildings, gardens, tombs and what looks like a religious complex.”

5. The Lost Villages of Ontario, Canada

The ‘Lost Villages’ include a total of 10 Canadian towns. The said towns were former municipalities of Cornwall and Osnabruck in Ontario. These regions were submerged after the construction of a waterway that was built in the 1950s, which required building of a dam across the St. Lawrence River. As of now, there are still buildings and sidewalks that are visible from some areas above the surface of the water.

6. Atlit-Yam, Israel

This Neolithic settlement lying off the coast of Israel in the Mediterranean Sea, is reportedly around 8000 years old. Although there are several complexes underwater that claim to be the oldest, Atlit-Yam has definite proof to claim that it’s actually the winner of the ‘oldest’ title. The city was discovered in 1984, and that too in 30-ft underwater, where graves, buildings, and odd skeletons were found. However, the most interesting thing that was found here were the seven megaliths that were in a circle, which seemed like an underwater Stonehenge. Reports suggest that an earthquake, followed by tsunami must be the reason behind the settlement getting submerged.

7. Phanagoria, Russia

Reportedly, it was once the ancient Greece’s largest city, and the capital of the Bosporan Kingdom. Founded around 540 BC, Phanagoria stretched across the Taman Peninsula in the Black Sea, which is now part of Russia. Reports have it that a third of the old city has already submerged Black Sea waters, whereas two-thirds are still on land, which makes this spot a great archaeological site, with new discoveries still being made.